Cory Lum/Civil Beat

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has approved the planned acquisition of Hawaiian Electric Industries by Florida based-NextEra Energy, according to a joint press released issued by the two companies on Monday.

NextEra announced in December that it was planning to purchase Hawaii’s major electric utility as part of a $4.3 billion deal.

The purchase includes Hawaiian Electric Co. on Oahu, Hawaii Electric Light Co. on the Big Island and Maui Electric Co., which serves Maui, Lanai and Molokai.

As part of the deal, American Savings Bank, a subsidiary of Hawaiian Electric Industries, will be spun off into an independent company.

Jim Robo, chairman and CEO of NextEra Energy, stands beside Connie Lau, president and CEO of Hawaiian Electric Industries, at a press conference announcing the $4.3 billion merger.

Cory Lum/Civil Beat

The purchase still has to be approved by Hawaii’s Public Utilities Commission and HEI shareholders. The PUC has indicated that it may not rule on the deal until the middle of next year. Meanwhile, more than two dozen entities, including solar trade groups, county and state agencies and other energy companies have intervened in the quasi-judicial proceedings taking place before the PUC.

“Approval by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission represents a significant step toward the completion of our merger,” Jim Robo, chairman and chief executive officer of NextEra Energy, said in a statement. “Through our partnership, we will apply our combined expertise and resources to deliver significant savings and value to Hawaiian Electric customers. We will continue to work closely with our

Comments

The Beat

  • Feds Give OK to NextEra Purchase of Hawaiian Electric

    ·By Sophie Cocke
    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has approved the planned acquisition of Hawaiian Electric Industries by Florida based-NextEra Energy, according to a joint press released issued by the two companies on Monday. NextEra announced in December that it was planning to purchase Hawaii’s major electric utility as part of a $4.3 billion deal. The purchase includes Hawaiian Electric Co. on Oahu, Hawaii Electric Light Co. on the Big Island and Maui Electric Co., which serves Maui, Lanai and Molokai. As part of the deal, American Savings Bank, a subsidiary of Hawaiian Electric Industries, will be spun off into an independent company. Jim Robo, chairman and CEO of NextEra Energy, stands beside Connie Lau, president and CEO of Hawaiian Electric Industries, at a press conference announcing the $4.3 billion merger. Cory Lum/Civil Beat The purchase still has to be approved by Hawaii’s Public Utilities Commission and HEI shareholders. The PUC has indicated that it may not rule on the deal until the middle of next year. Meanwhile, more than two dozen entities, including solar trade groups, county and state agencies and other energy companies have intervened in the quasi-judicial proceedings taking place before the PUC. “Approval by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission represents a significant step toward the completion of our merger,” Jim Robo, chairman and chief executive officer of NextEra Energy, said in a statement. “Through our partnership, we will apply our combined expertise and resources to deliver significant savings and value to Hawaiian Electric customers. We will continue to work closely with our
    Read more
  • Duckworth Could Be Senate’s 2nd Female Combat Vet

    ·By Chad Blair
    As expected, Tammy Duckworth is running for the U.S. Senate. According to The Hill, Duckworth, a Democratic congresswoman, says she’s running “because it’s time for Washington to be held accountable and to put Illinois families and communities first.” Duckworth is a disabled Iraq War veteran. As Bloomberg reports, if she can unseat Republican Sen. Mark Kirk, Duckworth will become the second female combat veteran elected to that chamber. U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth at a campaign event for state Rep. Mark Takai in 2014. Chad Blair/Civil Beat The first is Joni Ernst, a Republican who won in Iowa last year. “Ernst and Duckworth’s entrance into the spotlight comes as the overall number of veterans in Congress is on the decline, but as veterans of the post-9/11 wars in Iraq and Afghanistan — women and men — find roles in Washington,” says Bloomberg. In 2012, Duckworth and Tulsi Gabbard, the Democrat from Hawaii, became the first female combat veterans elected to the House, according to the Rutgers Center for American Women and Politics. Duckworth is a graduate of McKinley High School on Oahu and served in the student government with Mark Takai at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Takai was elected to Congress in November.
    Read more
  • Lawmakers to Hold Community Town Hall Meeting on Rail

    ·By Chad Blair
    A community town hall meeting to discuss the rail project is scheduled for Monday, March 30, at 5:30 p.m. at Washington Middle School 1633 S King St. Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell and Honolulu Authority for RapidTransit (HART) officials are expected to be in attendance. The meeting is being held by state Sens. Brickwood Galuteria and Les Ihara, state Reps. Scott Saiki, Della Au Belatti and Scott Nishimoto; and Honolulu Council member Ann Kobayashi. Mayor Kirk Caldwell at the Legislature on March 19. Cory Lum/Civil Beat Should be some fireworks generated at the meeting, no? The rail project has been in the news a lot lately, especially regarding efforts to extend Oahu’s general excise tax to help pay for the $6 billion project. I should clarify: $6 billion and growing. Read Civil Beat’s related editorial, Honolulu Rail: Big Questions Demand a Legislative Special Session.
    Read more
  • Takai on Junket to Asia With Pelosi, Other Reps

    ·By Chad Blair
    Mark Takai  the  Democrat representing Hawaii’s 1st Congressional District, is participating in a congressional delegation trip to Cambodia, Vietnam, Myanmar (Burma), South Korea and Japan. According to Takai’s office, the delegation arrived in Cambodia on Saturday. “This trip through Asia will be focused on critical issues to the U.S. such as trade, human rights, and security concerns,” according to a press release. Here’s a quote from Takai:  “We are at a critical juncture for U.S.–Asia relations and this trip will provide us an opportunity to engage in meaningful dialogue with leaders from across Asia as to how we can greater increase cooperation. “With Hawaii’s economy tied in closely with Asia’s, I am particularly interested in the impacts of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement that is currently being negotiated. …” The trip is billed as a “bipartisan” outing, but only one Republican is joining Takai, Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California and seven other Democrats. Tokyo. Flickr: Luke Ma
    Read more
  • Bill to Help Cops Develop Body-Worn Camera Programs

    ·By Chad Blair
    Several members of Congress think body cameras on police will help both cops and the people they are sworn to protect. U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawai‘i) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.), and U.S. Reps. Corrine Brown (D-Fla.), Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) and Brenda Lawrence (D-Mich.) last week introduced the Police Creating Accountability by Making Effective Recording Available (Police CAMERA) Act of 2015. Body-worn cameras for police. Flickr: West Midlands Police The legislation would create a pilot grant program to help state and local law enforcement agencies develop “safe and effective” body-worn camera programs “that also protect civilians’ privacy rights,” according to Schatz’s office. “The relationship between our communities and the men and women who protect them is based on trust and accountability,” Schatz said in a statement. “In communities like Ferguson, we have seen that public trust eroded by reports of racism and use of excessive force by police. Body-worn police cameras are already being used by some police departments and have shown to be effective in keeping our communities safe.” In places like Ferguson, public trust in police has eroded. Today I intro’d a bill w @SenRandPaul to expand the use of police body cameras. — Brian Schatz (@brianschatz) March 26, 2015 Schatz’s office says that supporters of the Police CAMERA Act of 2015 include the American Civil Liberties Union, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. It also has local support. “It is my hope that the
    Read more
  • C-SPAN Mixes Up Hawaii Politicians

    ·By Chad Blair
    Roll Call’s gossip blog has this item on an unfortunate, if somewhat humorous, recent broadcast on C-SPAN. Excerpt: Mind you, us print folks have already copped to occasionally being stumped by which older white man in a suit is popping off at the mouth. But our counterparts over at C-SPAN appear to be having real trouble differentiating among Asian-American lawmakers. The comedy of errors commenced as soon as Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., stepped up to the mics. Sorry, guys, but the fact that the chair ceded the floor to the gentleman from California should have tipped you off that that couldn’t be Rep. Mark Takai, D-Hawaii, taking the GOP to task about climate change. Some 13 hours later, it was time to cast Sen. Mazie K. Hirono, D-Hawaii, in a terribly awkward light. Yep, in the ultimate #ThrowbackThursday, Team C-SPAN resurrected the nameplate for the late Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawaii and briefly attached it to the sitting solon. It’s not the first time that the “Heard on the Hill” blog has reported on the mistaken identification of Asian-American pols. Read Is That Mark Takai? Or Mark Takano? Or Ted Lieu? To know exactly who is whom in the new Congress, get a copy of Roll Call’s handy guide.
    Read more
  • Kenoi Used County Credit Card at Hostess Bar

    ·By Chad Blair
    The Hawaii Tribune-Herald has this item about Hawaii County Mayor Bill Kenoi and misuse of a government credit card. Excerpt: Despite strict rules against using county-issued credit cards for personal purposes, and a prohibition against purchasing alcohol with them, Mayor Billy Kenoi charged $892 on his county card at a Honolulu hostess bar one December day in 2013. Kenoi said Friday he reimbursed the county for the expense on his purchasing card, or pCard, in March 2014. Finance Director Deanna Sako confirmed the mayor did. “Any error in judgment in the use of my card is entirely my own,” Kenoi said. “I take full responsibility for the purchases on my card. … Certainly, I could have exercised better judgment.” Kenoi said he’s used the county card for personal purchases on other occasions, but he always reimbursed the county. It’s not known how often this occurs because repeated attempts by West Hawaii Today to get copies of the credit card statements have been turned back by the county. … The bar, Club Evergreen, “is one of several Korean hostess bars in downtown Honolulu, where patrons buy drinks for themselves and for hostesses who sit and enjoy them with the customers,” according to the Tribune-Herald. Hawaii Mayor Billy Kenoi at the Legislature in January 2015. Cory Lum/Civil Beat
    Read more
  • Nozoe Leaving Hawaii DOE for Post at Federal Level

    ·By Nathan Eagle
    Hawaii’s chief academic officer is leaving the state Department of Education next month for a job in Washington, D.C. Ronn Nozoe, Hawaii DOE deputy superintendent since 2010, has been appointed to serve as deputy assistant secretary for policy and programs in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education at the U.S. DOE, school officials announced Friday. Hawaii DOE Deputy Superintendent Ronn Nozoe, pictured here in March 2014 at an educational talk at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, has accepted a job with the U.S. DOE. Eugene Tanner/U.S. DOE“His experience as a teacher, principal, superintendent and state leader make him well qualified to help the U.S. Department of Education’s effort to partner with states and local districts to help ensure all students are successful,” Deborah Delisle, assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, said in a release. State DOE Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi and U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono also praised Nozoe for the work he’s done in Hawaii and his potential at the federal level. “Ronn has been a great asset in our state and served our students and educators well,” Hirono said. “I know he’ll be a wonderful leader in the U.S. Department of Education, implementing policies that will help students be successful nationwide.” Nozoe’s last day in his current job is April 24. The DOE has started an internal recruitment process to fill the position. “At the heart of any real change and improvement are deeply committed and selfless people who are willing to put the cause — in our case, kids — before their individual
    Read more
  • Why Can’t We Watch HART Meetings on TV?

    ·By Nick Grube
    Officials at the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation like to tout transparency, but City Councilman Trevor Ozawa thinks they can do more. This week Ozawa introduced a resolution to encourage HART to televise its public meetings through Olelo Community Media or other public access channels. The meetings could also be streamed online. Honolulu City Council Trevor Ozawa wants HART to be more transparent. Cory Lum/Civil Beat He wants those meetings on air so that citizens can track decisions being made on the city’s $6 billion rail project, which is underfunded and over-budget. As Resolution 15-80 states: “… the City Council finds that the size, expense and importance of the Honolulu Rail Transit project merits the televising of HART Board and committee meetings so that government transparency can be achieved and public trust in the project can be gained by informing Honolulu residents of the issues, discussions and plans surrounding the project …” Adding to the significance is the fact that Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell and HART officials, including Executive Director and CEO Dan Grabauskas, are doing their best to lobby state lawmakers to extend a half-percent surcharge on the general excise tax to pay for rail. Right now the tax is expected to expire in 2022. But Caldwell and Grabauskas are pushing for an extension of at least 25 years.
    Read more
  • US Senate Passes GOP Budget Along Party Lines

    ·By Chad Blair
    The U.S. Senate approved a Republican budget resolution just after 3 a.m. Friday morning in a 52-46 vote, “capping a grueling day of floor work that required lawmakers to take sides on dozens of amendments,” as The Hill reports. “Only two Republicans voted against the budget: Sens. Ted Cruz (Texas) and Rand Paul (Ky.). Cruz announced this week he is running for president in 2016, and Paul is expected to do the same shortly.” Sens. Mazie Hirono and Brian Schatz along with all Democrats and the two independents voted against the GOP budget. The Mall in Washington, D.C. Cory Lum/Civil Beat Hirono took to the Senate floor Thursday to argue about how the Senate budget “favors special interests and the wealthy and would hurt our middle class and economy,” according to her office. The U.S. House of Representatives passed its own budget resolution Wednesday, so the two chambers will have to resolve their differences after the Easter recess. Both budgets are heavy on increasing defense spending while cutting money for other programs.
    Read more
  • Hawaii Senators Praise Reid As ‘Fighter, Friend, Mentor, Steady Hand’

    ·By Chad Blair
    Harry Reid, the leader of U.S. Senate Democrats, is retiring, and Hawaii’s two senators are offering their praise for his service. Brian Schatz released this statement following the announcement of the news: “Democratic Leader Harry Reid is one of the smartest and toughest people I know.  As our Democratic Leader, Harry never backed down from a challenge—working to protect Social Security and Medicare, pushing for immigration reform, passing the landmark Affordable Care Act, and fighting for his home state of Nevada.  Harry has always been willing to stand up for what’s right, and our country is a better place because of him. “Harry has been a wonderful friend and a mentor, and he will leave behind a remarkable legacy.  But this Congress has just begun and I look forward to continuing our work together as he finishes out his term.”  Mazie Hirono issued this comment via Twitter: Senator Reid is a fighter for the middle-class and a champion for immigrant families and the AAPI community. (1/2) pic.twitter.com/hCPAYHM5oM — Senator Mazie Hirono (@maziehirono) March 27, 2015 “AAPI” stands for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Hirono added, “He’s been a steady hand for our caucus, and his leadership and resolve will be missed next Congress. I wish him and Landra all the best.” Landra is Reid’s wide, of course. Meanwhile, Reid has said he’d like to see Chuck Schumer of New York take his place.
    Read more
  • US Senate Endorses Same-Sex Marriage Benefits

    ·By Chad Blair
    Roll Call has this item regarding same-sex rights and the U.S. Senate. Excerpt: The Senate endorsed Social Security and veterans benefits for married gay couples Thursday night in a 57-43 vote, with 11 Republicans joining every Democrat. The amendment slowed down the vote-a-rama, with a group of Republicans huddled in the well and at times talking to sponsor Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii. The nonbinding amendment to the budget resolution still falls short of the 60 votes needed to beat back filibusters in the chamber. … After the vote, Schatz released the following statement about the legislation, which also credits Democratic Sens. Patty Murray of Washington state and Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire: “Gay couples legally married in any state should be entitled to veterans and Social Security benefits identical to any other married couples. Tonight, eleven Republicans joined Democrats in recognizing that gay couples deserve equal treatment, regardless of where they live. We still have work to do to, but this is progress and a win for equal rights. I thank Senator Murray and Senator Shaheen for their leadership on this important issue.”   Democrat Mazie Hirono of Hawaii was among those voting in the majority. The Senate Thursday night was enduring a lengthy round of votes on multiple bills. Visitors on the top floor of the Newseum enjoy views of the west side of the Capitol building. Cory Lum/Civil Beat
    Read more
  • Schatz Pushes for Federal Financing of Transit-Oriented Development

    ·By Nick Grube
    U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz has teamed up with two of his colleagues to help cities, such as Honolulu, spur development around public transit stations, particularly those associated with rail. In a joint press release, Schatz and U.S. Sens. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), and Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) announced legislation that would make available money for loans and lines of credits that could be used on transit-oriented development projects. Funds would come through the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program. U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz is a sponsor on legislation that could help encourage development around Honolulu’s future rail line. Cory Lum/Civil Beat Transit-oriented development, or TOD, is a buzz phrase commonly associated with Honolulu’s $6 billion rail project. The idea behind TOD is to redevelop communities around transit stations to make them more pedestrian friendly. It can also be used as an economic driver to encourages redevelopment. “This bill would provide another tool for cities to facilitate smart, long-term planning and investment in neighborhoods near public transit, giving working families more convenient transportation options,” Schatz said in a statement. “By making projects financially feasible in neighborhoods around transit, we can build safer communities, improve our infrastructure, and create jobs while preserving water and undeveloped land.”
    Read more
  • Lockheed Martin, Kampachi Farms Team Up on Ocean Aquaculture

    ·By Chad Blair
    West Hawaii Today has this item on a new venture regarding harvesting the seas. Excerpt: The world’s largest defense contractor, Lockheed Martin, is teaming up with NELHA-based Kampachi Farms on a venture to make open-ocean aquaculture commercially viable. Forever Oceans, as the venture’s termed, will take to the next level Kampachi Farms’ mobile fish pen system, known as Vellela, which recently wrapped up research and development, by enhancing the means for monitoring and controlling the at-sea apparatus and creating a commercial demonstration project, Kampachi Farms co-CEO Neil Sims tells West Hawaii Today. “We’ve gone and done the research. We’ve proven there is tremendous and phenomenal potential, and now it’s time to move forward,” Sims said. Kampachi Farms is a six-man outfit that uses open-ocean fish cages to raise fish reared at the company’s headquarters at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority in Kona. … The newspaper adds that Lockheed Martin Chief Technology Officer Keoki Jackson says the venture can take advantage of  technology robotics, satellite communications and command and control — “things that are right in Lockheed Martin’s wheelhouse.” Screen shot. Kampachi Farms
    Read more
  • US House Agrees on Boehner-Pelosi Medicare Bill

    ·By Chad Blair
    Who says the U.S. Congress can’t get anything done? “The House on Thursday overwhelmingly voted to repeal automatic payment cuts to doctors under Medicare, endorsing a rare bipartisan deal that Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) negotiated with Democrats,” says The Hill. “The bill, which passed by a vote of 392-37, puts Congress on the precipice of ending a fight nearly two decades old over a formula known as the sustainable growth rate.” The Washington Monument. Cory Lum/Civil Beat Boehner crafted the deal with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). The “doc fix” legislation now heads to the Senate, where its fate is less certain. President Obama has expressed support, h0wever. Rep. Mark Takai of Hawaii, a Democrat who voted for the Medicare bill along with Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, said this in a statement: “With today’s permanent (Sustainable Growth Rate) fix, we remove the uncertainty that has plagued our kupuna and their doctors, and seniors across the nation will now have access to the healthcare security they deserve. …  “In addition to the SGR fix this bill would also reauthorize the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Just as healthcare security is important for our elders, it is equally important for our keiki, and reauthorization of CHIP will ensure that the children of our most vulnerable families have continued access to quality care.”
    Read more
  • House to HART: Open Up Your Books

    ·By Nick Grube
    Hawaii lawmakers, who are considering the extension of a tax hike to pay for Honolulu’s $6 billion rail project, want more assurances before they sign off. On Wednesday, the House Transportation Committee passed two resolutions to audit the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation, which is overseeing construction of the elevated railroad system. Construction has barely begun on Honolulu’s rail project, yet it’s already in need of more money. Cory Lum/CIvil Beat According to KITV, Committee Vice Chair Matt LoPresti said the audit is response to cost overruns and other issues that have left the project with a nearly $1 billion shortfall. “I think it’s necessary that everybody in the state have faith and confidence in the process, that they know where the money’s going,” said Lopresti. “I think we need to dig in and make sure we understand even where the contractors and subcontractors are spending (money); make sure we’re doing all the cost savings and responsible spending that people expect from us.” But HART Executive Director and CEO Dan Grabauskas has said the project is already under a lot of oversight, including from the federal government and its own financial auditor, and that additional oversight would be unnecessary. The Legislature is considering two bills that would extend Oahu’s half-percent general excise tax for rail beyond its 2022 sunset. City and HART officials say that money is needed to complete the project and comply with federal grant guidelines. For more on the project and the financial challenges it’s facing read Civil Beat’s
    Read more
  • US House Passes GOP Budget, Splitting Parties

    ·By Chad Blair
    Republicans in the Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday approved a 2016 budget in a 228-199 vote “that represents a major victory for GOP leaders after a rocky start to their year,” according to The Hill. “The budget would increase defense spending next year by boosting the Pentagon’s war fund to $96 billion, well above President Obama’s $58 billion request,” the report explains. The U.S. Capitol with its dome under remodeling, February 2015. Chad Blair/Civil Beat Tulsi Gabbard and Mark Takai of Hawaii voted against the measure, as did all other House Democrats and even 17 Republicans. In a statement after the vote, Takai said he preferred a Democratic alternative budget “because it seeks to invest in the future of our country and to ensure the preservation of the American Dream.” Takai continued: “The Democrat’s budget lifts the sequester caps for both defense and non-defense spending, reversing some of the harmful cuts that have hurt this nation deeply and will continue to limit future growth. Included within the Democrat’s budget are our clearly stated priorities to support working class families, provide a quality education at a reasonable cost, and to support America’s crumbling infrastructure system.” The U.S. Senate is expected to vote on the GOP budget by the end of this week.
    Read more
  • DOE to Pet Owners: Schools Are Not Dog Parks

    ·By Chad Blair
    The state Department of Education says it has received “a number of complaints” about pet owners bringing their dogs onto school property after school hours. “Schools, particularly in the Castle-Kahuku and Kailua-Kalaheo complex areas (in Windward Oahu), have seen an increase in dog waste on schoolyards,” Lea Albert, the complex area superintendent for Castle-Kahuku, said in a press release Wednesday. “Some of our schools are being used as a dog park.” Yikes! Sounds like a mess. In fact, Albert says, schoolyards are “actively used” by students and adults for educational, recreational and athletic purposes. “It’s important that our community help us ensure that our campuses are a healthy and safe environment,” she adds. All DOE schools have signs posted that indicate pets are prohibited on the campuses, and the DOE “kindly asks” pet owners who have been walking their dogs on campuses to obey the signs.
    Read more
  • Hawaii State Courts Resolve Language Access Issues

    ·By Chad Blair
    The U.S. Department of Justices says that it has closed its review of the Hawaii Judiciary’s Language Access Program “following the department’s successful provision of technical assistance to the Hawaii Judiciary.” That’s according to a press release issued Tuesday. The DOJ had received complaints about the court system’s provision of language services to what are known as “limited English proficient” or LEP individuals in state court proceedings and operations. Allegations were made regarding violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which requires recipients of federal financial assistance such as courts “to provide competent language services free of charge to LEP individuals in court proceedings and operations.” A Hilo courtroom. PF Bentley/Civil Beat It’s estimated that almost 13 percent of Hawaii’s population have limited English proficiency. “I commend the Hawaii Judiciary for its proactive efforts to provide all communities with equal access to justice regardless of the language they speak,” Acting Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta of the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division said in a statement. “The results we are seeing in Hawaii are a testament to what collaboration and cooperation can achieve. Hawaii knows its work is not done, and we welcome the opportunity to continue to provide assistance whenever needed.” The judiciary’s accomplishments include: Issuing policy stating that all LEP individuals are to be provided “competent court interpretation free of charge in court proceedings, and that language services would also be provided for other court operations.” Implementing an awareness campaign “to increase the public’s knowledge on how to access the court’s language services, including the creation of
    Read more
  • Fight Against Albizias Stalls in Hawaii Legislature

    ·By Chad Blair
    The Hawaii Tribune-Herald has this item regarding legislation and trees. Excerpt: A Senate bill seeking funding to control albizia trees on Hawaii Island has stalled after failing to cross over to the state House of Representatives. Proponents of the bill say they were surprised by the failure of the measure, in light of the devastation wrought by the invasive trees following Tropical Storm Iselle. “I was shocked,” said Springer Kaye, manager of the Big Island Invasive Species Committee. “The Big Island has been trying to get some relief on this issue from the Legislature for years, and if being hit by a hurricane and having people without power up to three weeks — and possibly altering an election — doesn’t get enough attention on the issue to get it separate funding, I don’t know what will.” Senate Bill 591 was sponsored by state Sen. Russell Ruderman, D-Puna, and sought an appropriation of about $2 million to the Hawaii Invasive Species Council to fund a coordinated management effort of albizia trees on the Big Island and across the state. It was one of a raft of legislation introduced this session to address the rapidly growing trees, which are susceptible to snapping and collapsing in high winds, playing havoc with power lines and anything else unlucky enough to be below them. … The Tribune-Heralds says Ruderman “has been in talks with other legislators about the possibility of including a line item in the
    Read more