Special Report { Uncovering Police Misconduct In Hawaii

Part 2

In the Name of the Law: UH Students vs. The Police

Part 2 of a 5-part series

Click here to read all the stories in Civil Beat's special report: In The Name Of The Law.

On March 29, 1994, nearly 500 police officers staged a show of force at the state courthouse in downtown Honolulu the likes of which hadn’t been seen in the islands before or since.

The huge demonstration was meant to intimidate a handful of University of Hawaii journalism students who wanted to know the names of Honolulu police officers who had been suspended or discharged for misconduct.

Patrol cars took up every parking space around ...

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Part 3

In the Name of the Law: Hawaii Police Union 'Outguns' Students

Part 3 of a 5-part series

Click here to read all the stories in Civil Beat's special report, In The Name Of The Law.

Even before Hawaii Circuit Court Judge John Lim unequivocally championed the public interest in police disciplinary actions and ruled against the State of Hawaii Organization of Police Officers, SHOPO had a Plan B — get the Legislature to do what the courts would not.

SHOPO had reason to believe this would work — and it did. Hawaii is a union-friendly state, and the police had recently convinced lawmakers to narrow public disclosure of misconduct to officers whose ...

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Part 4

In The Name Of The Law: What The Police Commission Isn't Doing About Misconduct

Part 4 of a 5-part series

Click here to read all the stories in Civil Beat's special report, In The Name Of The Law.

On a Wednesday just before Christmas, Chief Louis Kealoha addressed the Honolulu Police Commission.

The police commission meets twice a month, its primary role to watch over the police department, keep track of the police chief and hear citizen complaints.

But on Dec. 5, the Honolulu chief didn’t update the commission in open session on conduct in his department, pending investigations or any disciplinary actions taken against officers.

Instead, Kealoha sat at a conference ...

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Part 5

In The Name Of The Law: Should Police Misconduct Be Public?

Last of a 5-part series

Click here to read all the stories in Civil Beat's special report, In The Name Of The Law.

Eighteen years ago former Hawaii Gov. Ben Cayetano let bad cops off the hook when he allowed county police officers who got in trouble to remain anonymous.

Back then he said he was torn by his decision. But now he says granting that secrecy was a mistake.

His trust in the system of checks and balances has eroded over the past two decades.

“The reason I changed my mind is that during the last 10 years ...

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