The Value of Hawaii: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future

"The Value of Hawaii" is a collection of 28 essays edited by Craig Howes and Jon Osorio, published by the University of Hawaii Press in late summer 2010.

The book's subtitle is "Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future." Written for a general audience, "The Value of Hawaii" is meant to provide "a cluster of starting points for a larger community discussion of Hawaii that should extend beyond the choices of the ballot box this year."

The back cover of the book describes the project this way: "At a time when new leaders will be elected, and new solutions need to be found, the contributors to The Value of Hawaii outline the causes of our current state and offer points of departure for a Hawaii-wide debate on our future. The brief essays address a wide range of topics — education, the environment, Hawaiian issues, media, tourism, political culture, law, labor, economic planning, government, transportation, poverty — but the contributors share a belief that taking stock of where we are right now, what we need to change, and what we need to remember is a challenge that all of us must meet."

Editor Howes makes a few key points in his introduction, the 29th essay in the book:

  • The book is not a repair manual.
  • The book is not a shared manifesto.
  • And although it is similar in certain ways, the book is not just an update of "The Price of Paradise", University of Hawaii Law Professor Randall Roth's edited volumes from 1992 and 1993. (You can find the complete text of both Price of Paradise books online, Volume I and Volume II.

The major differences, Howes writes, are in timing, focus and tone. A major theme of "The Price of Paradise," he says, was that government was too big and intrusive. Although two of the authors in the new book also wrote for "The Price of Paradise," the others expand the dialogue started in those two books.

"The Value of Hawaii assumes that we need to know how we got into the current state of affairs, and that we need to change attitudes as well as policies if we hope to restore, and to be directed by, what is truly valuable about Hawaii," Howes writes.

Contents

Here is a complete list of the essays in the book.

  • Craig Howes — Introduction
  • Tom Coffman — Reinventing Hawaii
  • Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio — Hawaiian Issues
  • Sumner La Croix — The Economy
  • Ramsay Remigius Mahealani Taum — Tourism
  • Charles Reppun — Agriculture
  • Kathy E. Ferguson and Phyllis Turnbull — The Military
  • John P. Rosa — Race/Ethnicity
  • Lowell Chun-Hoon — Labor
  • Karl Kim — Transportation
  • Chad Blair — Government
  • Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie — Law and the Courts
  • Mari Matsuda — Public Education
  • Neal Milner — University of Hawaii
  • Meda Chesney-Lind and Kat Brady — Prisons
  • Susan M. Chandler — Social Services
  • Trisha Kehaulani Watson — Homelessness
  • Susan Hippensteele — Domestic Violence
  • Deane Neubauer — Health and Healthcare
  • Marilyn Cristofori — Arts
  • Ian Lind — Journalism
  • Patricia Tummons — Terrestrial Ecosystems
  • Chip Fletcher — Climate Change
  • Henry Curtis — Energy
  • D. Kapua‘ala Sproat — Water
  • Dana Naone Hall — Sovereign Ground
  • Sara L. Collins — Historic Preservation
  • Davianna McGregor — Hawaiian Sustainability
  • Carlos Andrade — Haena

Essays series on Civil Beat

Here is the schedule of the essay excerpts that will appear in the free section of Civil Beat. Each of these authors has agreed to participate in the discussions on the site during the week their essay is the center of debate.

  • July 26 — The three major themes of the book by Craig Howes; the book's connection with an earlier collection of essays, "The Price of Paradise," by Chad Blair; and government by Chad Blair
  • Aug. 2 — Hawaiian issues by Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio
  • Aug. 9 — Economy by Sumner La Croix
  • Aug. 16 — Tourism by Ramsay Remigius Mahealani Taum
  • Aug. 23 — Agriculture by Charles Reppun
  • Aug. 30 — Reinventing Hawaii by Tom Coffman
  • Sept. 6 — Military by Kathy Ferguson and Phyllis Turnbull
  • Sept. 13 — Law & Courts by Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie
  • Sept. 20 — Public Education by Mari Matsuda
  • Sept. 27 — University of Hawaii by Neal Milner
  • Oct. 4 — Prisons by Meda Chesney-Lind and Kat Brady
  • Oct. 11 — Climate Change by Chip Fletcher
  • Oct. 18 — Energy by Henry Curtis
  • Oct 25 — Water by D. Kapua'ala Sproat

Events

Beatups

The authors have also agreed to hold live events at Civil Beat headquarters, 3465 Waialae Ave., Suite 200, where you'll be able to talk about the essays with them in person. The events are free and open to the public. We ask that you make reservations by RSVP'ing to beatup@civilbeat.com.

The first Beatup was held on Thursday Aug. 5: Craig Howes, Jon Osorio and Chad Blair

The next Beatup will be on Thursday, Sept. 2.: The Economy, Tourism, and Agriculture in Hawaii
. Talk story with Sumner La Croix, Ramsay Remigius Mahealani Taum and Charles Reppun.

  • Thursday, September 23, 5:30-7:00 pm Reinventing Hawaii, Law and the Courts — Talk story with Tom Coffman and Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie.

  • Thursday, October 7, 5:30-7 pm. 

Public Education, the University of Hawaii
 and Prisons. Talk story with Mari Matsuda, Neal Milner, Meda Chesney-Lind and Kat Brady.

  • Thursday, October 28, 5:30-7:00 pm The Climate, Energy, and Water in Hawaii
. Talk story with Chip Fletcher, Henry Curtis, and D. Kapuaala Sproat.


To RSVP for a Beatup, or to get more information, please e-mail beatup@civilbeat.com.

Other Events

  • August 30, 6:00 pm.
    Radio Show with co-editors Craig Howes and Jon Osorio.
 Tune in to KZOO 1200 AM
With host Willa Tanabe of Talking Out Loud.
  • Sept–Feb, Monthly panel discussion at Chaminade University Bringing together The Value of Hawaii contributors with other officials and community members.
 All Thursdays, a different topic each month:

Date Topic Author
Sept 16 The Economy Sumner La Croix
Oct 14 Domestic Violence Susan Hippensteele
Nov 18 Homelessness Trisha Kehaulani Watson
Dec 09 Prisons Meda Chesney-Lind and Kat Brady
Jan 13 Public Education Mari Matsuda
Feb 10 Social Services Susan Chandler

If you have questions about events, please E-mail The Value of Hawaii

  • Friday, September 3, 12:30-2:00 The Value of Hawaii in the Women’s Studies Colloquium Series
 — Featuring Mari Matsuda, Meda Chesney-Lind, Kat Brady, and D. Kapua‘ala Sproat. 
UH Mānoa campus, Saunders Hall 624; co-sponsored by Departments of Women’s Studies and English.

  • Sunday, September 12, 3-5 pm VH contributors on The Military, Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Hawaiian Issues
 — Featuring Kathy Ferguson, Patricia Tummons, and Jon Osorio at Revolution Books, Puck’s Alley.

  • Thursday, September 23, 5:30-7:00 pm Reinventing Hawaii, Law, and the Courts — 
A “Beatup”/Meetup talk-story session with Tom Coffman and Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie. 
At the Civil Beat offices — 3465 Waialae Ave., Suite 200 (the Central Pacific Bank Building). 
Free and open to the public, but RSVP required—pls send an email to beatup@civilbeat.com

  • Saturday September 25, 1:00 pm-1:00 am We Value Hawaii: Art/Music/Dialogue. 
Join us for an all-day, all-ages event at Fresh Café, Queen Street: Art and digital media workshops, multi-media installations, slam poetry, bands, and more. Support local art and music, and register to vote!

  • Thursday, September 30, 12 noon-1:10 pm The Value of Hawaii Lunchtime Series at UH Manoa
. Speakers TBA, at Kuykendall 410; co-sponsored by the UHM Chancellor’s Office.

  • Thursday, October 7, 12 noon-1:10 pm The Value of Hawaii Lunchtime Series at UH Manoa
. Speakers TBA, at Kuykendall 410; co-sponsored by the Chancellor’s Office.

  • Thursday, October 7, 5:30-7 pm. 

Public Education and the University in Hawaii
. A “Beatup”/Meetup talk-story session with Mari Matsuda and Neal Milner. 
At the Civil Beat offices — 3465 Waialae Ave., Suite 200 (the Central Pacific Bank Building)
Free and open to the public, but RSVP required—pls send an email to beatup@civilbeat.com

  • Thursday, October 14, 12 noon-1:10 pm The Value of Hawaii Lunchtime Series at UH Manoa
. Speakers TBA, at Kuykendall 410; co-sponsored by the Chancellor’s Office.

  • Thursday, October 21, 12 noon-1:10 pm The Value of Hawaii Lunchtime Series at UH Manoa
. Speakers TBA, at Kuykendall 410; co-sponsored by the Chancellor’s Office.

  • Wednesday, October 27 11:30-1:00 Kaneohe Business Group Luncheon — Craig Howes and Jon Osorio

  • Wednesday, October 27, evening (TBA) The Price of Paradise and The Value of Hawaii. More details TBA


  • Thursday, October 28, 12 noon-1:10 pm

 The Value of Hawaii Lunchtime Series at UH Manoa
. Speakers TBA, at Kuykendall 410; co-sponsored by the Chancellor’s Office.


  • Thursday, October 28, 3:30 pm The Value of Hawaii for the Hogan Policy Forum
. Featuring co-editors Craig Howes and Jon Osorio, at the Pacific Club. 
Invitation required

  • October 28, 5:30-7:00 pm The Climate, Energy, and Water in Hawaii
. A “Beatup”/Meetup talk-story session with Chip Fletcher, Henry Curtis, and D. Kapuaala Sproat.
 At the Civil Beat offices — 3465 Waialae Ave., Suite 200 (the Central Pacific Bank Building)
Free and open to the public, but RSVP required— pls send an email to beatup@civilbeat.com

  • November 10, 3:006:00 pm Panel discussion on Violence Against Women and Hawaiian Issues
. More details TBA; co-sponsored by Girl Fest Hawaii.

More on the Book

Bios of Authors of Essays on Civil Beat

Carlos Andrade is Associate Professor and Director at Kamakakuokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. He returned to university at age forty-three, earned a BA in Hawaiian Studies (1989), a MEd in Educational Counseling (1993), and finally a doctorate in Geography (2001). He is a father of three, grandfather of five, has lived as a subsistence fisherman and farmer, and worked as a musician and professional boat captain. A former crewmember aboard Hokulea on two voyages in 1985 and 1993, he is a recording artist, a composer of songs, a practitioner of ki hoalu (slack key guitar), and an author.

Chad Blair reports on state issues for Honolulu Civil Beat. He previously reported for Pacific Business News, Hawaii Public Radio, and Honolulu Weekly. Blair holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of Hawaii at Manoa (1996), and has taught political science, communications, journalism, English, and other disciplines at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Hawaii Pacific University, Chaminade University of Honolulu, and Honolulu Community College. He is author of Money, Color and Sex in Hawaii Politics (Mutual, 1998), and was a Racial Justice Fellow 2005–2006, at the Institute for Justice and Journalism, University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication.

Kat Brady is Coordinator of Community Alliance on Prisons, a community initiative promoting smart justice strategies for Hawai‘i’s lawbreakers for more than a decade.

Meda Chesney-Lind is Professor of Women’s Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and the author of numerous books on imprisonment in the United States, including Invisible Punishment: The Collateral Consequences of Mass Incarceration (New Press, 2003), and most recently, Beyond Bad Girls: Gender, Violence and Hype (Routledge, 2009), with Katherine Irwin.

Tom Coffman is an independent researcher, writer, and documentary producer. He moved to Hawaii in 1965, and began his work as a newspaper reporter, first for the Honolulu Advertiser and then the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. He also worked as a field coordinator for the Honolulu Community Action Program. Books by Tom Coffman include Catch A Wave, Nation Within, and The Island Edge of America. Films include O Hawaii, Nation Within, and First Battle: The Battle for Equality in Wartime Hawaii. A written biography of the labor lawyer Ed Nakamura, And Justice for All, is soon to be released by the University of Hawaii Press, and a new documentary film, Ninoy Aquino and the Rise of People Power, is being distributed nationally by PBS.

Henry Curtis has been Executive Director of Life of the Land since 1995, and has a BA in Economics from Queens College, City University of New York. He is a community organizer, videographer, director, producer, peer reviewer, moot court judge, community facilitator, and provides expert testimony on ocean power, biofuels, energy, and externalities at the Public Utilities Commission, where he has represented Life of the Land in over twenty regulatory proceedings. He is committed to Hawaii’s energy self-reliance and well-being, and is motivated by the values of aloha aina, malama aina, and his love for Hawaii nei.

Kathy E. Ferguson is Professor of Political Science and Women’s Studies at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. She is co-author of Oh, Say, Can You See? The Semiotics of the Military in Hawaii (U of Minnesota P, 1999). She is currently writing a book on Emma Goldman.

Chip Fletcher is Professor and past Chair of the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. He and his wife have raised three children in Kailua, Oahu.

Craig Howes has been Director of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa since 1997, Editor and Co-Editor of the journal Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly since 1994, and a faculty member in the Department of English since 1980. The co-producer and principal scholar for the television documentary series Biography Hawaii, he has also been active in Hawaii’s arts and humanities communities. A past President of the Hawaii Literary Arts Council and a former board member of Kumu Kahua Theatre, he currently serves as President of Monkey Waterfall Dance Theatre Company and as a member of the board for the Hawaiian Historical Society.

Sumner La Croix is Professor of Economics and Research Fellow in the University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Mānoa. He is co-author of Government and the American Economy (Chicago, 2007), and a co-editor of Institutional Change in Japan (Routledge, 2006), and Challenges to the Global Trading System (Routledge, 2007). La Croix is an associate editor of Asian Economic Journal, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Economic History.

Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie is an Associate Professor and Director of Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law, William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii at Mānoa. After serving as a law clerk to Hawaii Supreme Court Chief Justice William S. Richardson, she joined the staff of the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, a public interest law firm advancing Native Hawaiian rights. Prof. MacKenzie is chief editor for the second edition of the Native Hawaiian Rights Handbook, and has litigated cases dealing with Hawaiian lands, asserting traditional and customary rights, and defending the constitutionality of Hawaiian programs.

Mari Matsuda is author of two of the hundred most-cited law review articles in the United States. She is a founder of Critical Race Theory, a professor of law, and a proud product of Hawaii public schools, including Mānoa Elementary, Stevenson Intermediate, Roosevelt High School, and the William S. Richardson School of Law. She is the author, with Charles Lawrence, of a forthcoming book entitled The Last Public Place: Essays on Race, Education, and Democracy.

Neal Milner is Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. He is also a political analyst. He headed the UH Manoa Ombuds Office from its beginning in 2006 until the office was shut down in 2009.

Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio, PhD, is Professor of Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, a historian of the Hawaiian Kingdom, and a practicing musician and composer. He has been an advocate for the restoration of Hawaii’s political independence, and writes about the sovereignty movement in Hawaii. He and his wife Mary live in Pālolo, and have sent all of their children to public schools and Kamehameha High School.

Charles Reppun was born and raised in Hawaii, and has been farming with his brother Paul for thirty-plus years. They grow all kinds of food, with taro as a central focus. He also helped to draft the state water code.

D. Kapua‘ala Sproat is an Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s William S. Richardson School of Law, where she teaches courses and provides program support for Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law and the Environmental Law Program. Ms. Sproat has spent over a decade working on water issues on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii Island, both in her capacity as UH’s Environmental Law Clinic Director and as an attorney with Earthjustice, a public interest environmental litigation firm. She hails from the Island of Kauai and is a member of the Akana and Sproat ohana.

Ramsay Remigius Mahealani Taum is President of the Hawaii-based Life Enhancement Institute (LEI) of the Pacific LLC. He lectures on host cultural values in the workplace at the University of Hawaii School of Travel Industry Management (TIM), is on the Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau Board of Trustees, HVCB Marketing Advisory Committee, and the Hawaii Tourism Authority Hawaiian Cultural Program Advisory Group. Taum works with travel, leisure, retail, and development industries integrating cultural values and principles into contemporary business, and is a sought after keynote speaker, lecturer, trainer, and facilitator. His work promoting sustainable place-based Hawaiian cultural stewardship principles and practices is acknowledged locally, nationally, and internationally.

Phyllis Turnbull is retired from teaching in the Political Science Department at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. She is co-author of Oh, Say, Can You See? The Semiotics of the Military in Hawaii (U of Minnesota P, 1999).

Loading
Have feedback? Suggestions?

Related Content